What does a Registered Building Surveyor do?

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What does a Registered Building Surveyor do? 2017-01-25T12:02:24+00:00

What does a Registered Building Surveyor do?

Provide Expert Advice on property and construction related matters. Registered Building Surveyors are experienced in acting as independent and impartial experts, providing reliable advice and reports.

A Registered Building Surveyor can be experienced in the following work areas;

Investigation and Reporting

Over the last 10 years or so, “leaky homes” have received a great deal of publicity. Our Registered Members have developed considerable expertise in the investigation and reporting on “weathertightness” related failures in domestic buildings.

Investigating and reporting on less common building failures and commercial buildings (especially high rise) involves more specialised disciplines which a number of our Registered Members have experience in.

Other forms of investigation and reporting a Registered Building Surveyor may undertake include:

• Building defect or building failure investigation and reporting.

• Inspection and premises condition reporting, prior to purchase, for disposal or for leasehold requirements.

• Interpretation and reporting on construction compliance issues.

• Condition inspections and reporting for short or long term maintenance planning requirements.

Pre Purchase Inspection Reports

Registered Building Surveyors can provide a prospective purchaser with knowledge about the current condition of a dwelling and what to expect in terms of significant defects, significant maintenance and other factors such as any gradual deterioration. This reporting can be part of an overall due diligence assessment of any proposed purchase.

Remediation

If you are thinking of partly or fully recladding your house, either because you suspect (or know) there are problems with the existing cladding, or because the market has severely devalued your house merely because of the type of cladding, the Registered Members that are remediation specialists will be able to advise you on what is involved to complete a compliant repair.

Alternatively, if you have building defects that need repair and need firstly to understand the problem before a repair solution is found, a Registered Member can assess this and offer an appropriate repair recommendation and if requested, design the repair solution.

Contract Administration

Find a Registered Member to administer your construction contract, ensuring that an appropriate design, contract form and procurement is found and who will then be able to assess demands for payment are appropriately dealt with, variations to the contract are handled efficiently and the contract is satisfactorily completed.

Dilapidation Reports (Lease Reinstatement)

Many Registered Members provide schedules of condition of premises at lease commencement. However when no such schedule is prepared there is still an obligation on a Lessee (and Landlord) at lease termination.

A schedule can be prepared by a Registered Member to identify repairs, make good or maintenance obligations that the tenant (or landlord) may have under the terms of their lease. Often this is needed at the end of a lease, at least.

Such specialist reports can advise a Lessee or Landlord of potential dilapidation liabilities and cost estimates; and/or aid in understanding or minimising financial exposure during a lease, when considering lease renewal or, more typically, at lease termination.

Schedule of Condition Reports

These are prepared for either the Tenant or Landlord of commercial premises at the commencement of a lease to identify legal obligations and to record the condition of the property.

The purpose of the report is to record the condition to enable an understanding of the level of reinstatement considered necessary at the end of a lease, intended to protect parties from unwarranted reinstatement claims.

Dispute Resolution

Within the Institute you will find members with significant experience as arbitrators, mediators and “expert witnesses” in construction disputes.

These three roles all require the member to be impartial and independent, in contrast to a lawyer who is generally engaged to be the client’s advocate.

Building Technology and Construction

This includes providing advice on the performance of building materials and systems, their selection, usage, assembly, anticipated life span, repair and the effects of natural elements.

Building Maintenance Reports

These can be long-term or planned maintenance reports assessing the present condition of the internal and external building fabric of a commercial or residential property, together with its infrastructure.

Insurance Assessment and Reinstatement

Registered Building Surveyors can assist insurance companies in providing impartial expert advice relating to property-related insurance claims to determine the likely causes of the damage due to insured events; lack of maintenance; defective construction; or poor workmanship.